Hemo-Lymphopoietic Malignancies Surround the Women of the Family: A Case Report and Literature Review

  • Behjat Kalantari-Khandani Department of Oncology, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  • Ali Akbar Haghdoost HIV/STI Surveillance Research Center, and WHO Collaborating Center for HIV Surveillance, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  • Mohsen Momeni Modeling in Health Research Center, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  • Mina Danaei Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
Keywords: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Neoplasms, Risk factors

Abstract

The co-occurrence of different types of hemo-lymphopoietic malignancies within a family provides clues about the pattern of inheritance and common environmental risk factors. A family presented with developing hemo-lymphopoietic cancers in three female first-degree relatives: a mother and her daughters.Case 1 was diagnosed with Walden Strom's macroglobulinemia at age 57. Case 2 and 3 presented with chronic myelogenous leukemia at age 32 and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma at age 28, respectively. There were not any significant common environmental risk factors in this family, but all three cases suffered from skin dermatitis and one of them, who suffered from chronic myelogenous leukemia, was diagnosed with morphea. This family had a sedentary and stressful lifestyle.Genetic is the foundation of some familial aggregation of cancers. Common lifestyle habits and environmental etiologies are important. Morphea as an autoimmune disease could have the essential role in developing hematolymphoid malignancies.

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Published
2018-04-05
How to Cite
1.
Kalantari-Khandani B, Haghdoost AA, Momeni M, Danaei M. Hemo-Lymphopoietic Malignancies Surround the Women of the Family: A Case Report and Literature Review. ijhoscr. 12(2):92-7.
Section
Case Report(s)