Original Article

Study of Peripheral Mononuclear Cells and CD34 Levels as a Predictive Marker for Initiating Apheresis in Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

Abstract

Background: Autologous HCT in multiple myeloma is done as upfront treatment in newly diagnosed transplant eligible patients after induction chemotherapy. In addition, it is standard for relapsed, aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), and is curative in ~40% to 45% of patients. Over a decade many efforts were made to find helpful parameters to predict an optimal time for initiating an efficient peripheral blood stem cell collection so that adequate stem cells are collected.  It has been well accepted that CD34+ cell count in peripheral blood before leukapheresis is the best parameter to predict CD34 cell yield. However, white blood cell count, mononuclear cell count, and other easily obtained parameters are still used to guide the clinical practice of peripheral blood stem cell mobilization and collection. 

Materials and Methods: In the present study, we analyzed the correlation between peripheral blood MNC and Apheresis CD34 levels and also between peripheral blood CD34 by flow cytometry and apheresis CD34 levels.

Results: We found that there was a statistically insignificant weak correlation between peripheral MNC and apheresis CD34. There was a statistically significant strong correlation between peripheral CD34 and apheresis CD34.

Conclusion: The results show that peripheral blood MNC was analogous indicating that no reliable prediction can be done for CD34 cells collected in apheresis while peripheral CD34 by flow cytometry is the strongest predictor for initiating stem cell collection.

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IssueVol 15 No 3 (2021) QRcode
SectionOriginal Article(s)
Published2021-07-14
DOI https://doi.org/10.18502/ijhoscr.v15i3.6847
Keywords
Peripheral blood mononuclear cells; Peripheral CD34 cells; Apheresis CD34 cells; Predictive marker for apheresis

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How to Cite
1.
PK K, Sarathy P V, BJ S, Badarkhe G, KS R, S T, Bayas N, Mufti S, V H, Naik R. Study of Peripheral Mononuclear Cells and CD34 Levels as a Predictive Marker for Initiating Apheresis in Autologous Stem Cell Transplant. Int J Hematol Oncol Stem Cell Res. 2021;15(3):170-177.