The Relationship between Primary Hyperparathyroidism and Thrombotic Events: Report of Three Cases and a Review of Potential Mechanisms

  • Theocharis Koufakis Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism - Diabetes Center, First Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, AHEPA Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Vasiliki Antonopoulou Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism - Diabetes Center, First Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, AHEPA Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Maria Grammatiki Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism - Diabetes Center, First Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, AHEPA Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Spyridon N Karras Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism - Diabetes Center, First Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, AHEPA Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Ramzi Ajjan Division of Cardiovascular and Diabetes Research, Leeds Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds Ringgold Standard Institution, Leeds, UK
  • Pantelis Zebekakis Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism - Diabetes Center, First Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, AHEPA Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Kalliopi Kotsa Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism - Diabetes Center, First Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, AHEPA Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece
Keywords: Calcium, Primary hyperparathyroidism, Thrombosis, Stroke, Pulmonary embolism, Deep venous thrombosis

Abstract

We have described three uncommon cases of patients who presented with clinical thrombotic events (stroke, pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis) during the course of a hypercalcemia-induced hypercoagulable state. After thorough investigation, the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism - due to a parathyroid adenoma - was established in all cases. The association between hypercalcemia and venous or arterial thrombosis has been previously described; however, relevant data are still insufficient. The existing evidence in the field was reviewed and the interesting underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms were also discussed. Further studies are required to shed more light on the unusual, still intriguing relationship between calcium and thrombosis.

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Published
2018-07-04
How to Cite
1.
Koufakis T, Antonopoulou V, Grammatiki M, Karras S, Ajjan R, Zebekakis P, Kotsa K. The Relationship between Primary Hyperparathyroidism and Thrombotic Events: Report of Three Cases and a Review of Potential Mechanisms. ijhoscr. 12(3):174-9.
Section
Case Report(s)